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« The Gift of Anxiety | Main | Supernatural pre-suppositions »
Wednesday
Nov042015

One is the loneliest number

A while ago, my dear friend, Persis, sent me a book about women's issues. The book is called Women Caught in the Conflict: The Culture War Between Traditionalism and Feminism, by Rebecca Groothius. I knew who Groothius was before reading the book, and I knew that this book is written from a perspective with which I have disagreements. In reading this, I have not fallen of some sort of theology wagon. There is value in reading things which challenge or thoughts. There is my defense for all three of my readers.

The book, as the sub-title indicates, is about the tension between what is seen as tradition and what is seen as feministic. It's very enlightening. Groothius has done her homework. So far, one of the most compelling things I have read is her comment about the danger of individualism:

At the core of virtually all modern ideology is the creed of radical individualism. The individual -- his or her rights, needs, desires, and so forth -- is considered paramount and absolute. The individual's basic responsibility is see to be herself or himself, rather than to others. This consummate self-centeredness, in whatever sphere it is applied, inevitably results in the breakdown of friendship, marriage, family, community, and society. The problem inheres, then, not in the idea of women's rights per se, but in basing an understanding of women's rights on the humanistic world view of radical individualism.

Quite a few years ago, I took the one and only political science course of my university education. The author of the textbook echoed similar thoughts, pointing out that our political convictions will arise from whether we see the individual or the greater good as paramount. This is also applicable in our life of faith.

We come to Christ on our own. We do not come to Christ through church membership, or on the faith of our parents. That much is clear. But once we are born of the Spirit and members in the body of Christ, the principle of community and thinking outside ourselves becomes crucial, just as Paul says in Romans 12:3-8:

For by the grace given to me I say to everyone among you not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think, but to think with sober judgment, each according to the measure of faith that God has assigned. For as in one body we have many members, and the members do not all have the same function, so we, though many, are one body in Christ, and individually members one of another. Having gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, let us use them: if prophecy, in proportion to our faith; if service, in our serving; the one who teaches, in his teaching; the one who exhorts, in his exhortation; the one who contributes, in generosity; the one who leads, with zeal; the one who does acts of mercy, with cheerfulness.

Yes, we are individuals, but we are members of one another as well. Individualism taken to an extreme is ultimately not good for the Body of Christ. And I don't think it's good for society, either. There are days when I look around, and the words of Judges echo in my head: "And everyone did what was right in his own eyes."

I'm not sure what else I will learn from this book, or how it will challenge my thinking, but this principle of the danger of extreme individualism is something we all have to be aware of, whether we're talking about serious issues in the church or just living our day to day lives in the privacy of our homes.

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Reader Comments (2)

I'm glad the book is giving you food for thought. I pulled my copy off the shelf to reread. I agree 100% that individualism is not healthy for society or the church. But losing our individuality to a corporate entity or another person isn't healthy either. Oneness in Christ is not the Borg. In either extreme, I am king or the organization is king. Christ's Lordship seems to be the way to avoid both pitfalls.

November 4, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterPersis

Yes, I agree, Persis; extremes in either direction are not good. I hope I didn't communicate otherwise.

November 4, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterKim Shay

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