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« Great Effects by Weak Means | Main | Stop the world, I want to get off! »
Thursday
Nov172016

What women's ministry should have as a goal

In the past few days, I have read a few things about women's ministries. Despite the fact that I seldom read Christianity Today, there was an interesting article about women's ministry in light of some of the controversy over Jen Hatmaker. I have never read anything by Hatmaker. Sometimes, all it takes is watching how a woman treats others on Twitter to know that one does not need to read a writer's work.

Women's ministry is big business. Just think of some of the conferences that are attended; the books; the DVD curriculum; the teaching material. Someone is making money from the fact that women want to be ministered to. Women want to be challenged, to think theologically and biblically, and there are those who are willing to help. It is sad, however, that women have to go outside of their local church.

I have never been drawn to the big name speakers. The closest I have ever come to going down that road was when I was a Precept leader. I was trained by Precept, I taught studies, and I attended workshops and conferences. And after a while, I began to tire of it. I had learned what I needed. I began to want to do things differently than the way I had learned through Precept. It had served its purpose, and I moved on. Technically, that is what Precept envisions. It promotes people becoming leaders. And I think that principle of discipling someone in order to release her should be the goal.

This is the problem with some of the big name speakers. They attract fan girls. People flock to their conferences year after year. Women use their prepared curriculum year after year. Women hold those speakers up as authorities. Even women with smaller followings will eventually have women who look to them as authorities. There is certainly nothing wrong with soliciting opinions, but I have always been concerned about women givingso much regard to teachers who will never know them well.

Ultimately, women's ministry ought to seek to disciple women. And discipleship does come to an end. Look at the model of Jesus. He had the twelve with him while he was on earth. One of his goals was to prepare them for his eventual departure. It was never the design that the apostles would never be able to go out on their own. That is what building the kingdom involves: equipping people to stand on their own.

That is what I find missing in most of the big name women's ministries, and some of the smaller ones. The church doesn't need groupies. It needs women who are equipped. Personally, I'd rather see the young women in my church begin to develop independence. Some of the women I have taught were once my students as teens. I have watched them grow and mature. I love it when I hear that a young woman is moving out on her own, or has read a book and come to her own conclusions that it was not a good book. I would never want to be responsible for the continual spiritual appetites of thousands of women. I would rather they had the ability to pick up their Bibles, and feast. I would like to see better "how to" Bible study material, but that's a separate pet peeve of mine, and not the point of this post.

As I said, though, women's ministry is big business, and as long as there are publishing houses, women who are willing to produce for them, and an audience who likes to see things done up bright and beautiful, there will be big name speakers. We live in a culture that is ripe for such a phenomenon.

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Reader Comments (2)

Good thoughts, Kim. I loved this:

"I would never want to be responsible for the continual spiritual appetites of thousands of women. I would rather they had the ability to pick up their Bibles, and feast. "

I think I would be intimidated by being responsible for the appetite of one other woman. I wonder if many women are actually looking for a mediator between them an God whether it is a celebrity or even an older woman in the local church. There's healthy encouragement, but I get concerned when it is implied that a younger woman's spiritual growth is dependent on another woman in her life.

November 17, 2016 | Unregistered CommenterPersis

I agree, Persis. I have always been a little uncertain about contrived mentoring relationships. I know some women who think there is something wrong with them because they aren't in a significant mentoring relationship.

November 17, 2016 | Registered CommenterKim

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