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Wednesday
Nov232016

Women, we can still learn from men

Every now and then, I listen to other women, and I feel uncomfortable. It is as if in order to be fully supportive of women in the church we must abandon men entirely. There is a trend toward only reading books by women. Women read books written by women, about women, and for women. Maybe I'm a little addled, but to me, the best book isn't the one written by a man or a woman: it's the one that is simply the most helpful, the best written, and the best researched.

In the last few days, there have been quite a few articles about women's ministry. The articles which promote the reading and studying of Scripture are the ones I like best. But still, there seems to be a reluctance to recommend a "How to" Bible study book written by a man. I'm going to be honest here: I've read a lot of books about how to study the Bible, and the ones I have found the most helpful are the ones written by men. I wish they had been written by women. I would love to see women in seminary, studying the original languages, learning about hermenetical principles. That has not happened a lot at this point.

Here are some of the "how to" Bible study books I have read in the 30+ years I have been studying the bible and the 20+ years I have been teaching the Bible:

Understanding and Applying the Bible, Robertson McQuilkin

How to Study Your Bible, Kay Arthur

How to Read the Bible For All Its Worth, Douglas Fee and Gordon Stuart

Bible Study: A Student's Guide, Jon Nielson

Bible Study: Following the Ways of the Word, Kathleen Nielson

Women of the Word, Jen Wilkin

Grasping God's Word, J. Scott Duvall and J. Daniel Hays

Journey into God's Word, J. Scott Duvall and J. Daniel Hays

Introduction to Biblical Interpreation, Klein, Blomberg, and Hubbard

Introduction to Biblical Hermeneutics, Walter Kaiser and Moises Silva

The last two titles are more advanced, and I wouldn't recommend a beginner start there, but neither would I discourage her if she wanted to. We have a tendency to start women off small, and while that may be useful for a woman who has no experience with the Bible, women are able to read difficult texts. We are a fairly literate society, and if women can be doctors, teachers, nurses, politicians, and accountants, they can handle a more advanced text.

If I was going to recommend just one of those books, it would be Journey into God's Word. No, it is not written like a book directed to women, as if the author and reader are having coffee. No, there isn't a pretty, feminine cover, but Journey into God's Word is clear and thorough. It lays an excellent foundation before proceeding to discuss the various literary genres in Scripture. And it is not long; 153 pages. But it provides a great starting point that will ultimately lead a person further in her study. Journey into God's Word is the condensed version of Grasping God's Word, and if I had to recommend a second book, that would be it. It gives a student a goal to aim for. If I was recommending a book to inspire a woman into studying, it would be Kathleen Nielson's. What we want as Bible students and teachers is to get better at what we are doing, to be more and more comfortable with interpreting the Biblical text. That is ultimately what we are doing as we teach. It's more than leading a group of women in a study. We are interpreting. And there are principles to help us with that.

I am not famous, so the chances of someone taking my views into serious consideration is probably small. I am not affiliated with a big parachurch organization, a mega church, or a famous Christian figure. But I have been learning and teaching a long time. I want the best resources I can find, regardless of whether a man or woman wrote it. If my suggestion that we continue to read books authored by men means I have failed my gender, do forgive me. It wouldn't be the first time I didn't toe the party line.

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Reader Comments (3)

Great list, Kim! The last two are on the reading list for a seminary class in which I'm planning to enroll.

November 23, 2016 | Unregistered CommenterDeb

I feel like there is a weird mentality among women: we want to be smart, but not too smart to threaten men. We want to know some theology, but not so much that it might threaten our chances for a husband, or might make us seem too whatever. So we settle for theology light, and we leave the real theology to the men, and then we overreact when we don't like what they say, but we don't really understand what they're saying either, because we don't understand the Bible.

I don't know what the solution to this is.

November 23, 2016 | Unregistered CommenterAngela

Angela: that is a very good insight.

Deb: those last two texts were used in my seminary class on hermeneutics.

November 23, 2016 | Registered CommenterKim

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