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« Married woman, do you have single friends? | Main | Canadian Patriotism »
Tuesday
Feb282017

Curiosity and the New Living Translation

A while ago, as a gift for a donation, the Gideons sent me a copy of the New Living Translation. I have not used this translation much in the past. In my plan to read as many translations of Romans as I can, I decided to try this out. I'm only five chapters in, but already something has popped up that reminds me why I am leary of more dynamic translations: a lack of precision.

In Romans 5:19, the NLT renders the verse this way:

Because one person disobeyed God, many became sinners. But because one other person obeyed God, many will be made righteous.

By way of comparison, here are how the NASB and the NIV render it:

NASB: For as through the one man's disobedience the many were made sinners, even so through the obedience of the One the many will be made righteous.

NIV: For just as through the disobedience of the one man the many were made sinners, so also through the obedience of the one man the many will be made righteous.

The NASB capitalizes pronouns referring to God and Jesus, and so has capitalized "One" to indicate that Paul is talking about Christ. Yes, it is interpretive in its choice. You'll notice that the NIV uses the more general term "man." I suspect in its goal to avoid gender specific language, the NLT has chosen the word "person." I may be wrong about that. 

What is important to remember is the context. Prior to verse 19, Paul was drawing a parallel between Adam and Jesus. Adam's sin is imputed to us, and Christ's righteousness is imputed to us. The crucial point here is that it is Christ's obedience which becomes our obedience, resulting in justification. We can understand what is meant by "the man" or "the One" because we know the context. Unfortunately, the NLT is less precise when it uses "one person." Which person? Can anyone impute sin to another? Can anyone impute righteousness? While the NLT can be helpful in complicated texts, what it lacks in precision could present a problem. When it comes to this doctrinal issue, the imputation of Christ's righteousness, we should strive for precision.I'm not a Greek or Hebrew scholar, so perhaps my ignorance has clouded my view of this. Hopefully, when I start Greek studies next fall, I will be able to look more closely at the original language and evaluate the accuracy of this rendering in a better way.

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